Stories for Louisville Kentucky

Mayors as Leaders in the Compassion Movement

As citizens, we understand the power of public policy and the choices that a Mayor can make. We know that budgets are moral documents that reflect the values of our community and are then carried out by our elected officials.

We also know that now is a tough time to hold public office with so many fellow citizens distrusting the government and the political process.  Therefore, we think it is particularly meaningful to recognize outstanding leaders who are committed to integrating compassion as a part of their approach to building community and setting public policy.

murrayWe are happy to report that the Honorable Mayor Ed Murray of Seattle has issued a Proclamation in support of the Love This Place: Serve the Earth Week coopetition taking place from April 18 to 26.

Here is a mayor’s proclamation that recognizes the extraordinary challenges we face as a planet such as “climate change, global health issues, violence, food and water shortages, and economic struggles.”

It also states that “each of us have a right to a healthy, sustainable environment;” and “the global community must come together to create compassionate solutions to our global challenges.”

With Mayor Ed Murray of Seattle and the Honorable Greg Fischer, Mayor of Louisville, we have two Mayors who are in tune with the urgent call of our time and who recognize the importance of compassionate responses to these challenges.

We also know that proclamations and speeches are not enough. These mayors are calling us to get engaged and give time in service to our communities to address these challenges and opportunities.

Mayor Greg Fischer from Louisville has organized Give A Day during the Mayor’s Week of Service that coincides with the “Love This Place! Serve the Earth Week” coopetition (April 18-26).

Mayor Fischer led the U.S. Conference of Mayors and passed a resolution calling for compassion as part of effective public policy.

In 2012, Mayor Fischer challenged Seattle and communities from all over the world to see who was the most compassionate city.

Seattle took up the challenge and this gave rise to the Compassion Games: Survival of the Kindest in which we harness the power of compassion and cooperation and add to it the spirit of friendly-competition. This approach to competition brings people together to play and live compassionately in their communities.

During the Compassion Games, teams participate in “coopetitions” that challenge us to amplify the love and compassion we feel as a way to make our communities safer, kinder, and better places to live.

Communities connect the groups, organizations, events, and activities that are already in place to co-create a “collective impact” through mass-collaboration.

Players participate in community service projects, random acts of kindness, act as “Secret Agents of Compassion,” and engage in other fun ways to bring about positive change in their communities. Cooperative play helps us develop the skills to build the capacity to act more compassionately towards each other, ourselves, and the earth.

The last step is a reflective one: Players report and share their acts of compassion and kindness with each other through an online crowdsourcing map. They record the number of volunteers, hours of service, monies raised for local causes, and numbers of people served.  Everybody who plays wins; no one can lose the Compassion Games!

In honor of our earth and Earth Day here is a beautiful video that is an ode to planet earth

 

We are very grateful to the mayor and his staff for mobilizing on behalf and in support of a love this place serve the earth week. Thank you Mayor Murray!

 

Mayor’s Give A Day of Service: http://www.mygiveaday.com/

Compassion Proclamation

 

Taking On the Challenge from Louisville, Kentucky

September 21st – Good Star Alignment for the Compassion Games

Early on we realized that September 21st was an ideal day to start the Compassion Games not only because it’s the United Way’s Day of Caring, but also because it’s the autumnal fall equinox and the much beloved International Day of Peace.

Fortunately this year, the Peace, Compassion, Happiness, Empathy, Understanding, Love and Generosity movements are all working together. We’re all after the same ideal of a better world for our children and grandchildren no matter what you call it. Compassion Games knows we’re interdependent so we’re operating as such and seeking to lift all boats in the process.

Locally, our kick-off event for the games on Friday, September 21st is at the Urban Art Mural project in the south end at 10 AM. Get ready to be creative with friends and neighbors as we take back a corner that’s had a violent history. In the afternoon we’ll have a table at the United Way Day of Caring after-party at Century Link Field starting at 3 PM, and then to end the day we’ll be a participant in the peace vigil and concert happening at the Interfaith Community Church, 7 PM. For over ten years we have worked with the Interfaith Community Church and the three Interfaith Amigos so it’s fitting to celebrate the opening with them. In fact, it was Ted Falcon of the Interfaith Amigos who suggested that we move from the “Golden Rule” to “The Golden Reality”, inspiring much of the vision for these games.

Globally, the Compassion Games is contributing to peace, compassion, and empathy initiatives taking place beyond the greater Seattle region by including them in our “Heart Map

Seattle prides itself on being a “glocal” city (global and local), e.g. we haven’t been shy about starting the games in Seattle as a response to a challenge from the mayor and friends in the City of Louisville! In creating the games we seek to be the “organizational backbone”, if you will, for all of the individuals and organizations in Seattle who have been working on behalf of a kinder, safer and more just world for everyone. Meanwhile, we encourage other cities and communities around the world to sign the Charter for Compassion and consider organizing Compassion Games in your community.

In the online space, we’re looking to create “waves of compassion” through social media streams. Please “like” us on Facebook, follow us on Twitter, share our posts and tweets with your friends and family and help us spread the word!

Most of all, if you’re in Seattle, be a player in the games! To join our newsletter and get involved, click here!

Compassionate Louisville: The Community Challenge

The inspiration for the Compassion Games comes from our friends in Louisville, Kentucky.  Mayor Greg Fischer and his team are implementing their compassionate cities program in a remarkable fashion.   After Seattle affirmed the Charter for Compassion and invited other cities around the world to join with us in creating 10 Year Campaigns for Compassionate Cities, Louisville was one of the first and by far the most developed cities campaign we encountered. The Compassionate Action Network International awarded them the International Compassionate City award in 2012.

Mayor Greg Fischer would welcome a rivalry. “I’ve said from day one that we’re going to pursue being recognized as the most compassionate city in the world – and if that prods other cities to try to outdo us, then ‘Game On.’ In a competition centered on compassion, everyone wins!”

Compassionate Louisville recently amassed over 90,000 hours of community service during their one-week long Give a Day program.  We’re following their lead and measuring the number of hours of community service and are encouraging other cities to agree upon this simple measure of hours of community service.  From their community challenge:

“We challenge you to volunteer more, to give more blood, to share more resources and to top our collective mark with the goal of leaving our world a better place. If a city tops us, next year we will step up our devotion because we know that in our garden of compassion, there is still rocky soil and arid places that need tending; and there always will be. We are not so naive as to think this is not a community with more than its fair share of pain and suffering. We know it is. We, however,believe compassion is good soil for the garden of community.”

“All I have tried to do,” Fischer said, “is pull the good hearts and good hands of Louisville together. From our cathedrals to our temples and mosques, from the Muhammad Ali Center to our Christian seminaries, we are a community that is built on faith, love and tolerance. This is who we’ve always been. All I’m doing is rallying the troops.”

Of course, Louisville has also been extremely compassionate in their support of us and other cities taking on this challenge. It has made all their materials available and if you’re interested you can access them here.  You can watch a video of their Livable City Award and their issuing the Community Challenge.  And yes Tom we intend to kick your butts!