Stories for Compassionate Seattle

The self-organizing network in Seattle.

Being Human Ain’t Easy: Unexpected Lessons from His Holiness the 17th Karmapa

We surely can’t complain about the mystery and thrill of being alive. Yet, regardless of one’s walk of life, it just isn’t easy being human.

downloadLike the tilted spinning of the Earth traveling through the Milky Way, having balance in one moment does not necessarily mean we will have it in the next. Life is messy. We are each challenged by the struggles of maintaining harmony in our relationships, by the incessant demand of finances and making a living, and of nurturing the physical and mental health of ourselves and those we love. We each desire meaning, belonging, and purpose in our lives.

These challenges in life, in their various forms and magnitudes, are a given. It is how we respond – not react – to life’s challenges that truly matter, transmuting them into all the more reason to love harder and be more compassionate toward others and toward ourselves, knowing we all suffer in one way or another.

Unfortunately, this is far easier to say and know than to do.Karmapa Image

Which is perhaps why thousands of people flocked like weary birds to Seattle Center on May 9th, to receive a drink of the cool, spring water that is the presence and teachings of His Holiness the 17th Karmapa, Ogyen Trinley Dorje. He is, after all, a shining example of compassion and love in a tumultuous world.

What we got, however, was something far different than expected. Something, I believe, that was far better.

First of all, His Holiness had a cold, leaving him visibly and admittedly drained. To top this off, Seattle was the last stop on his journey of events over the course of two months, which was extremely exhausting in itself.

Buddha or not, I thought, the Karmapa is human. This lesson, which had only just begun, was the greatest gift he could have given us. Here was a moment for us to have deep compassion for him. Curiously and unexpectedly, it wasn’t the last.

After forty-five minutes of his teachings about compassion from the Kagyu Buddhist tradition, a young panel of change-makers sat on stage with the Karmapa and asked him, each in turn, some very difficult questions.

One such question was from Jennifer Hotes, a young woman activist from a nonprofit called Love City Love which creates open spaces for artists to create art in community for one another for the sake of joy. She asked him:

“How do we have fun without using it as a way to escape from the suffering in the world, as a way to remind ourselves of the positive things in life?” She paused, almost forgetting to ask him the next part of her question with a sheepish but twinkling smile on her face. “And also, what do you do to have fun?”

The moderator quickly finished translating her question with a smile himself, and the Karmapa’s eyebrows went up in surprise. He put his hand to his chin in deep thought. He was, as clear as day, stumped! The audience laughed with him. To our surprise, here is some of what he said:

“It’s important in life, to not take things so seriously all the time. It’s important to remember to enjoy life to celebrate the good things… I remember when I was a young boy, my family would celebrate Losar, the Lunar New Year of Tibet. I remember that I would get so excited the day before that my siblings and I couldn’t sleep… We still honor Losar, but now I must follow set itineraries, the day is full of ceremony and ritual that I must fulfill. Sometimes I wish I could just lay in bed and sleep through it… As for what I do for fun now, I don’t know. I’ll have to give this more thought.”

As the last words of this were translated, the Karmapa unexpectedly began to speak again, which was translated to us once more:

“I really enjoy music and the arts. When I have time, I like to paint and make music. The arts are very important. That is all I have to say on the matter.”

It was an astonishing revelation, I think, for all of us. Quite simply, the Karmapa didn’t experience much of what it was like to simply play, to have fun.

This appears to be a common issue for everyday people and change-makers alike. We often feel guilty regarding the moments of joy in our lives when we know there is so much suffering in the world. Yet, play is an essential human need that allows us to connect with one another, building authentic relationships that can lead to sustainable action rooted in compassion. When we don’t take time to honor what is good and beautiful in life, we burn out. We lose our sense of wholeness. We actually become less effective at making positive change happen.

It is actually this concern that lead to us being invited to the event with the Karmapa at Seattle Center, to represent the CompassionCompassion Games Updated Logo for Shift Network Games and teach attendees about it. The Compassion Games are a social tool designed to ignite, amplify, and catalyze compassionate action in communities around the world. By infusing the power of playfulness and compassion with the fun of friendly competition, the Games offer a unique way to strive together to serve each other, our own personal well-being, and the Earth.

Experiencing the challenges that nonprofits face with finding financial support to grow and scale, the struggle can sometimes lead us to doubt the importance of play and the idea that you can use play to build the capacity of communities to be more compassionate. As we are currently fundraising to expand the Games to respond to a growing demand, this weighed heavily on our team’s hearts that evening.

Yet, once we began to speak with people about the Games, most people went from curiosity or confusion to an understanding grin on their face. “Team Seattle needs your help!” we would say humorously with feigned exacerbation. “The Mayor of Louisville said they were the most compassionate city in the world and would be so until kindliving1-300x245proven otherwise! In fact, he said they were so compassionate they would come here and help us beat them!” At that point, most people usually laughed and wanted to learn more. Obviously, no one can lose the Compassion Games, though they seem to tap into an innate human desire to want to play together, to do the heavy lifting in the world with a lighter heart. By doing so, the Games can help raise the capacity of compassion in our lives and our communities in ways we otherwise wouldn’t feel inspired, or believe were possible, to do.

This may be why the Compassion Games worked so well in a women’s prison, where for the first time ever there were eleven days of no violence while the Games were played. Or why they are so excitingly received in educational settings, where children can “cooperate to compete” to make their schools safer and warmer places to learn, and to experience compassion first hand.

We were feeling quite relieved about the reception of the Compassion Games at the Karmapa’s event, but then it happened: one of the change-makers of the panel on-stage, a young lady named Rekeda Roundtree from Roots of Empathy, asked another challenging question:

“It seems that competition is at the root of many social ills that we as a society face today. Can you tell us how competition creates barriers between people, how it is a separation that prevents us from connecting compassionately together to collaborate and make change?”

kl-stargirl02i-fish0814As an organization that aimed to use friendly competition as a kind of “culture hack” to get people excited about making a difference (the latin root for competition – “competere” – means “to strive together”), this question made our hearts skip a beat. Our team looked at each other with playfully worried smiles, holding our breath as we anticipated what would come next. Depending on his answer, we would either proudly stay, or try to make a break for it before mobs of outraged compassion-seekers descended on us.

The moderator asked if it was okay to inverse the question. He asked, “So, can I ask the Karmapa if fishastroheartpplcompetition can be used in a way that is positive, as a way to make positive social change?” The young woman, once again, reiterated her original question regarding competition’s more negative side, how it enhances social ills rather than alleviates them.

Here is what the Karmapa said:

“Competition is very pervasive in the world today, connected to many of the activities that lead to problems. Even when people are not engaged in competition – competition with distinct victors or those who are defeated – people may bring the energy of competition to their everyday lives, like in an argument and the need to be right at the expense of others. But, I think competition can have a positive aspect to it as well. Competition can be used as a motivator to better oneself, not to beat others but to compete with oneself to become more compassionate. In this way competition can be used to make oneself stand out, but in a positive way.”

All at once, we let our breaths out in a sigh of relief and laughed; there wouldn’t be any compassion mobs coming for us today. As it turns out, even the Karmapa believed that friendly competition could be used as a social force for good.

Once, His Holiness the 14th Dalai Lama said this when asked a similar question:

“Competition used to put others down: not good. Competition used to bring everybody up: that is very good.”

We were grateful that His Holiness the 17th Karmapa shared with us his down-to-earth human side. It allowed us, I believe, to see ourselves in him, not as an idol or state of perfection that we are not, but as a person like the rest of us. It made room for greater compassion toward ourselves in our own hardships, mishaps, and imperfections. Life is full of them, that’s for certain, but it’s easier to know that we are in them together, that even our suffering profoundly connects us all.

As for play and having fun: may we all enjoy the gifts that life has to offer us more often, not as an escape, but as a celebration to rejuvenate our spirits. And may the Compassion Games touch countless more lives by reminding us how to change the world by having fun, by reminding us of the child within us all.

We each desire to see the world become a more kind, safe, and loving place. It is much more rewarding when we do this together.

metrodetroit3

Story Written by Compassion Games Storyteller Joey Crotty
with support from Compassion Games Team Members Lesa Walker, Sande Hart, and Jon Ramer

Mayors as Leaders in the Compassion Movement

As citizens, we understand the power of public policy and the choices that a Mayor can make. We know that budgets are moral documents that reflect the values of our community and are then carried out by our elected officials.

We also know that now is a tough time to hold public office with so many fellow citizens distrusting the government and the political process.  Therefore, we think it is particularly meaningful to recognize outstanding leaders who are committed to integrating compassion as a part of their approach to building community and setting public policy.

murrayWe are happy to report that the Honorable Mayor Ed Murray of Seattle has issued a Proclamation in support of the Love This Place: Serve the Earth Week coopetition taking place from April 18 to 26.

Here is a mayor’s proclamation that recognizes the extraordinary challenges we face as a planet such as “climate change, global health issues, violence, food and water shortages, and economic struggles.”

It also states that “each of us have a right to a healthy, sustainable environment;” and “the global community must come together to create compassionate solutions to our global challenges.”

With Mayor Ed Murray of Seattle and the Honorable Greg Fischer, Mayor of Louisville, we have two Mayors who are in tune with the urgent call of our time and who recognize the importance of compassionate responses to these challenges.

We also know that proclamations and speeches are not enough. These mayors are calling us to get engaged and give time in service to our communities to address these challenges and opportunities.

Mayor Greg Fischer from Louisville has organized Give A Day during the Mayor’s Week of Service that coincides with the “Love This Place! Serve the Earth Week” coopetition (April 18-26).

Mayor Fischer led the U.S. Conference of Mayors and passed a resolution calling for compassion as part of effective public policy.

In 2012, Mayor Fischer challenged Seattle and communities from all over the world to see who was the most compassionate city.

Seattle took up the challenge and this gave rise to the Compassion Games: Survival of the Kindest in which we harness the power of compassion and cooperation and add to it the spirit of friendly-competition. This approach to competition brings people together to play and live compassionately in their communities.

During the Compassion Games, teams participate in “coopetitions” that challenge us to amplify the love and compassion we feel as a way to make our communities safer, kinder, and better places to live.

Communities connect the groups, organizations, events, and activities that are already in place to co-create a “collective impact” through mass-collaboration.

Players participate in community service projects, random acts of kindness, act as “Secret Agents of Compassion,” and engage in other fun ways to bring about positive change in their communities. Cooperative play helps us develop the skills to build the capacity to act more compassionately towards each other, ourselves, and the earth.

The last step is a reflective one: Players report and share their acts of compassion and kindness with each other through an online crowdsourcing map. They record the number of volunteers, hours of service, monies raised for local causes, and numbers of people served.  Everybody who plays wins; no one can lose the Compassion Games!

In honor of our earth and Earth Day here is a beautiful video that is an ode to planet earth

 

We are very grateful to the mayor and his staff for mobilizing on behalf and in support of a love this place serve the earth week. Thank you Mayor Murray!

 

Mayor’s Give A Day of Service: http://www.mygiveaday.com/

Compassion Proclamation

 

Compassion Torch and The Fremont Summer Solstice Parade

Team Seattle is organizing for the 2014 Compassion Games and has adopted a theme – the “art of compassion”. Therefore it was the perfect setting to kick off the 2014 pre-games by joining in on the Fremont Summer Solstice Parade.

Fremont, also known as the Artists Republic of Fremont, is a neighborhood in Seattle that identifies itself as the “center of the universe.” The heart and soul of this community is the Fremont Summer SolsticeFremont Arts Council who have produced the parade for over 20 years.  Members of the Fremont Arts Council have co-created the Compassion Games.

CompassionGames-facebook-logoThis year the Compassion Games introduced the Compassion Relays to invite people year-round to carry the Compassion Torch in their heart and share reports of our experiences in doing so, and as a way to herald the upcoming September games.

Ever since we produced the digital image of the Compassion Torch we have dreamt of there being a physical torch that we could bring to special events and occasions.

Denise and JRDenise Henrikson, (The Artful Instigator), led Team Seattle who responded to the challenge and we just carried the first Compassion Torch out to the universe at the Fremont Summer Solstice Parade last Saturday. This was an amazing experience and more evidence that Love Wins!

History of Our First Physical Torch

The Compassion Torch symbolizes enlightenment, life, hope and the regenerative power of the flame of the heart. We needed something spiritual and artistic so we reached out to our beloved friend and compassionista Sidney Genette, artist, musician, designer, and Burning Man host par excellence. Thanks to Sidney this happened within the span of a few weeks. Sidney is a magician!

Calvin Leaes His MarkSidney took me to meet his internationally known sculptor friend Calvin Allison who sat with Sidney and me and created the first basic frame for the torch.

A few days later, we had a dinner of fun and focus at the Compassion House and Sidney brought the torch over, in it’s earliest stage. Then Calvin took it and turned it into this and created the planking to carry it in.

On the night before the parade we gathered at the Fremont Arts Council Powerhouse with the planking and the torch and lots of community spirit in an amazing place dedicated to creating art for the community.Power House Fremont Arts Council

We had one day to pull it all together. We needed to create the hearts that symbolized in three dimensions of compassion; compassion for others, compassion for the earth, and compassion for ourselves.

Making HeartsThanks to Heather Elder the hearts were drawn and Ana cut them into hearts that were then painted by Gordon Wood and his team of artists including Ana, Jackie, JR, and Jeffrey.

Other artists included The Artful Instigator, and Tova who took on the overall decorating of the planking and the torch. Tova also worked with the ensemble that came together the day of the parade and brought the torch to the community.  Her eye and touch are incomparable!

IMG_3502The ensemble that showed up on Saturday included Torchbearers John Hale, ED from Compassionate Seattle and Gordon Wood who carried the torch every step of the way through the parade. john Hale

Surrounding the torch and torchbearers was the bringers of love, joy and good wishes to everybody. Sandra Poulson came as a Goddess of Compassion.Joey Crotty and Sandra Poulson

While Joey Crotty stood and walked for strength and valor — bringing the torch and the games. The other members of the ensemble included Libby Burk, and TAnne, Pamela and Mike on his unicycle.

We blew bubbles and gave out Hershey kisses interacting with the parade audience. Compassion Torch

The dialogue with the people at the parade shows the genuine enthusiasm and excitement for the games and for creating a culture of compassion here at home.IMG_3448

As we build up for the games we will use the Compassion Torch as part of the ritual of convening in the name of compassion.

Waving at ParadeI could not get over how much joy it brought to hand out Hershey kisses from the Compassion Games! Just a little bit of giving goes a long long way. We hope other communities will embrace the idea of using art and creating a Compassion Torch that signifies their commitment to enrich our experiences bringing compassion to life.

 

 

Looking for compassionate solutions to gun violence

Submitted by What’s Good 206

Why should you care about gun violence?

“It has no race, no creed, no age barriers. If it hasn’t affected you yet, it will if it continues.”

Stark words from one man interviewed in this array of community voices recorded at an anti-gun violence rally at Seattle’s Martin Luther King Memorial Park.

“It needs to be talked about among your family and friends,” says a police officer.

“We have to work to get the community out to say we’ve had enough of the gun violence and to mentor young men and older men and women on how to go through the healing process of having a son been a perpetrator and wrap our arms around them and say there’s healing,” says a pastor.

Listen closely. What you are hearing are solutions.

 

What’s Good 206 is Seattle’s source for youth driven media and information.

Smarter & more compassionate schools? Yes we can!


Submitted by What’s Good 206

Build more compassionate schools by combining students of different ages in the classroom, and fully integrating schools, says a 17-year-old high school senior who has written a book advocating overhaul of the educational system.

In this video produced by What’s Good 206, Nikhil Goyal also advises educators to start treating students respectfully and invite them into the conversation about their education.

Directed by
AUSTIN WILLIAMS
Hosted by
STARLA SAMPACO
Edited by
ALYSSA PIRAINO

You are compassion

Submitted by Dee Williams

Many people are studying compassion in order to introduce it into schools and other places. Some say it should be taught. Others have won awards for their programs that teach about compassion. Cities are touted as being the most compassionate. I guess this might be similar to the idea that “a corporation is a person”. Are we really ready to get serious about compassion? Even just saying the word may evoke a spark of “something” for you or me. I know that when I say or see the word it is as if I know it “compassion” intuitively.

My first impression about compassion was during my childhood when my pet hamster died. It was a sad time for me. But my friends and I decided to give the hamster a funeral. It was as if everyone came together to share my grief and help me get through that period of pain. I don’t recall that anyone laughed at the idea. I just remember that ceremony was just what I needed at the time.

I believe it is in us to be compassionate. We have an innate ability for compassion. I think it is linked to the same sense that tells us right from wrong. It is a felt sense of awareness about what is needed in a particular situation such as when a family member or pet dies. We have the instinctive response to feel sad for the person who lost a loved one (empathy) and the desire to perform some action that will help the other person feel better.

Compassion is part of our nature. It might be buried deep under some other emotion such as anger or fear making it difficult to fully express your compassion. If compassion is built into our human nature what does it take to nurture this quality? Can our innate compassion be further developed at all stages of our life? I think this is possible. I have read about great results from the practices of yoga and meditation to help many people open their hearts and allow their nature of compassion to grow. Once your heart opens you may begin to feel somewhat vulnerable to the ebb and flow of life. But it is our ability to connect with our own internal struggle for self-compassion that is the gateway towards directing our compassion towards others.

Instead of giving ourselves over to the struggles (obstacles) of life and feelings of defeat or hopelessness our practice of yoga and meditation guide us gradually to see the struggles of life with clearer vision and bring forth from within the strength and wisdom to overcome our obstacles. In learning the art of yoga and meditation we find the intuitive wisdom that reveals compassion as one of the many qualities built into our human nature. We also find the needed nurturing for opening our hearts.

And one effort to open hearts worldwide there is the Charter for Compassion and Seattle’s Compassionate City Proclamation. Check it out.

Dee is a local author and local instructor

She writes a blog at http://thekanjinyogacenter.blogspot.com/

Representatives of the Compassion Games Address the Seattle City Council and Council Members Help Spread the Word

On September 10, 2012, representatives of the Compassion Games: Survival of the Kindest briefed the Seattle city council on the goals and plans for the Compassion Games. The Council members committed to engage and help spread the word to their constituents. For example, council member Nick Licata posted about the Compassion Games and the briefing on his official blog.

Jon Ramer with Compassionate Seattle network is the Head Gamemaker (for all you Hunger Games fans) of the Compassion Games. He was joined at the council meeting by Louis Mendoza of the volunteer center of United Way of King County and Andrea Brenneke, a civil rights and employment lawyer and board member of Compassionate Seattle and the Compassionate Action Network International. Together, these three representatives displayed their passion and enthusiasm for creating greater compassion in the city of Seattle and, importantly, helping Seattleites discover where compassion already flourishes. You can see the briefing here; the Compassion Games portion begins just after minute 43:00.

 

The Games, of course, begin on September 21, 2012, the International Day of Peace, the United Way Day of Caring, and the Autumnal Equinox—as Ramer noted in his remarks—to October 21, 2012, the conclusion of Seattle’s “The Next 50” event and the end of their month focused on civic engagement. During the briefing, council member Licata stated, “I think that it’s very appropriate that this is starting here in Seattle given that I think we’re the #1 game-maker in the US if not the world.” Similarly, Brenneke signaled her and Seattle’s readiness to take up the city of Louisville’s challenge to best them in compassion through the inaugural Compassion Games: Survival of the Kindest. As Ramer declares at the end of the briefing, “Let’s all get SuperBetter!”

9/11 11 Years Later

Today is the 11th anniversary of 9/11, a day that changed so much for so many people. I know that it changed everything for me. What about for you?

I’ll never forget that Friday evening after 9/11 Shabbat service where Rabbi Ted Falcon invited Imam Jamal Rahman to speak, to make sure that people saw a different face of Islam. It was 9/11 that brought Ted, Jamal and Pastor Don McKenzie together to form the Interfaith Amigos.

My work in Seattle on helping to create a culture of compassion, understanding, kindness and justice goes back to those days. The work over the seven years from 2001 to 2008 built the relationships and commitment that helped us to be of service when his Holiness the Dalai Lama visited Seattle. Along with the Interfaith Amigos and the help of many volunteers who later formed the Compassionate Action Network International and Compassionate Seattle, we organized the Interfaith prayer breakfast for the Seeds of Compassion.

In commemoration of 9/11, KUOW had the Interfaith Amigos on the air this morning. The Amigos talked about their experiences of the last eleven years and what they’ve learned about how to create spiritually meaningful lives that aren’t based on any one particular religious tradition, but instead honor all paths.

They answered questions about their journey getting to know each other and how they’ve been able to tell others about the beauty and benefit of getting to know people outside of one’s familiar world. They affirmed the need we all have to create meaningful community, whether we consider ourselves religious or not, and noted the one thing that they believe to be at the core of each true spiritual path. To hear what they believe this to be, you can listen to their podcast by following the link here.

On Friday, September 21, the International Day of Peace, there will be a peace vigil and concert at the Interfaith Community Church (ICC), the spiritual home of Jamal Rahman. This event is part of the opening ceremonies of the Compassion Games. We invite you to get involved in the Compassion Games and join with us for 30 days of compassionate action to co-create a Seattle that’s a kinder, more just and better place to live.

Leave a comment below and tell us if you’ll be attending the opening ceremony at ICC. Also, if you enjoyed this article and the podcast, please help us spread the word and share this post with your friends and family!

September 21st – Good Star Alignment for the Compassion Games

Early on we realized that September 21st was an ideal day to start the Compassion Games not only because it’s the United Way’s Day of Caring, but also because it’s the autumnal fall equinox and the much beloved International Day of Peace.

Fortunately this year, the Peace, Compassion, Happiness, Empathy, Understanding, Love and Generosity movements are all working together. We’re all after the same ideal of a better world for our children and grandchildren no matter what you call it. Compassion Games knows we’re interdependent so we’re operating as such and seeking to lift all boats in the process.

Locally, our kick-off event for the games on Friday, September 21st is at the Urban Art Mural project in the south end at 10 AM. Get ready to be creative with friends and neighbors as we take back a corner that’s had a violent history. In the afternoon we’ll have a table at the United Way Day of Caring after-party at Century Link Field starting at 3 PM, and then to end the day we’ll be a participant in the peace vigil and concert happening at the Interfaith Community Church, 7 PM. For over ten years we have worked with the Interfaith Community Church and the three Interfaith Amigos so it’s fitting to celebrate the opening with them. In fact, it was Ted Falcon of the Interfaith Amigos who suggested that we move from the “Golden Rule” to “The Golden Reality”, inspiring much of the vision for these games.

Globally, the Compassion Games is contributing to peace, compassion, and empathy initiatives taking place beyond the greater Seattle region by including them in our “Heart Map

Seattle prides itself on being a “glocal” city (global and local), e.g. we haven’t been shy about starting the games in Seattle as a response to a challenge from the mayor and friends in the City of Louisville! In creating the games we seek to be the “organizational backbone”, if you will, for all of the individuals and organizations in Seattle who have been working on behalf of a kinder, safer and more just world for everyone. Meanwhile, we encourage other cities and communities around the world to sign the Charter for Compassion and consider organizing Compassion Games in your community.

In the online space, we’re looking to create “waves of compassion” through social media streams. Please “like” us on Facebook, follow us on Twitter, share our posts and tweets with your friends and family and help us spread the word!

Most of all, if you’re in Seattle, be a player in the games! To join our newsletter and get involved, click here!

Our Stand for Compassion at Seattle Center

As part of Compassionate Seattle’s plan to create “collective impact” we put together a physical “stand for compassion” that was on display at Seattle Center. On seven occasions we set up our stand and engaged with fellow citizens about our community and our plans to create a culture of compassion in our region.  We learned how people think and feel about compassion and how they see or don’t see themselves connected to other people and the greater community.

I came to believe that we are not just in an economic recession but we’re in a social recession as well. There’s no question that people want to see more compassionate action, as there is a mood of resignation and hopelessness associated with the current conditions.

However, being at Seattle Center offered us a bright spot as we told the story of the John T Williams Totem Pole Memorial and the difference that compassionate action made in turning a tragedy into an opportunity for healing. Two weeks after the shooting members of the John T William’s family and tribe met with city officials in a “restorative circle” that led to a peaceful creative solution, inspiring all of us to have similar courage.  At the Stand for Compassion at Seattle Center we met Tony Joe who met Rick and John T. Williams when she first arrived in Seattle in 1975.  Listen to Tony Joe describe her relationship with the Williams Brothers.

We also met people like Michael who a few times a week pulls over to help motorists in need. Hear his description of what he does and how he feels he’s representing Seattle when he does it!

The experiences we had being at Seattle Center taught us about our need to reconnect with each other and overcome the social isolation and disconnection.  This led to imagining the Compassion Games as a way to get us out of our norms and connected with each other.  Thank you to all the people who came down and helped us build a stand for compassion: Anne Stadler, Erik Lawyer, Susan Partnow, John Hale, Silvana Hale, Elle McSharry, Jeff VanderClute Libby Burk, Michael Truog, and John and Heidi Malcolmson.  Thank you to Seattle Center and the Next Fifty for supporting us in doing this. On to the games!