Stories for Random Acts of Compassion

These are news posts that pertain to the random acts of compassion.

Seattle Women and Girls League Dance for Justice

What a powerful time it is now on this planet. Now is a time where we can transform the conversations about the chronic problems of our planet into breathing more life into the change we desire to see. I am fired up about being a part of a new reality that is about more of me, us, and the collective.  I invite you to reveal a more organic way of being that awakens ideal change. How about a new way to be together in community that holds us in the ultimate safe zone for freedom, play, and intrigue in new colors of inspiration? Let’s raise our voices into a harmony that inspires our hearts, minds, and bodies up into liberated action.

I am inviting a new place for compassionate culture for women & girls to call home. Now is the time to let go of the old ways of doing everything alone. I am wanting to encourage a place where we can support letting go of the negative, marginalizing messages that inhibit empowerment of the feminine and replace them with tall and courageous believing. Removing the fear-based stagnant statements like, “being vulnerable is seen as weakness”, “being quiet about challenges is the right way”, acting as “superwoman” is defined by taking care of others’ needs while always smiling. Or, how about, “there is only enough for everyone to succeed at one time and sharing your ideas will deplete your chance for success”? Not one of these messages are grounded in truth.  I am wishing for a community-based on a new paradigm charged with the positive muscles of compassion.

I see many brilliant women and girls stuck wondering where to direct their great potential in the chaotic survival of daily needs. Who can you turn to about real life challenges? This stressful reality can be lonely, leading us down the road to oppression, resentment and backwards movement. Women must have healthy outlets of community to cultivate a new paradigm. Let’s say “goodbye” to simply talking about change and “hello!” to being the change we long for! How about we leave behind the meetings that are only about filling whiteboards with ideas and thoughts for the future? This style of influence is losing my attention. Are you looking for a more inspiring way to play in this world? I am ready to “break the chain” of old ways of impacting social justice change, and that is why I am excited about playing with Compassion Games.

I am wanting to cultivate a caring community that collaborates with leaders equally, energizes differences, celebrates authentic sharing, and supports the aim to serve. This movement is a sacred place where individuals are welcome to be more present in action that brings meaningful play to light. How about supporting a message that makes your heart, mind, body, and soul fly, while rippling out to all beings for a more compassionate universe?

Sommer Joy AlbertsenI am thrilled to introduce myself, Sommer Joy Albertsen, as one of the new progressive leaders of Compassion Games International. My intent is to contribute greatly to a social justice movement that takes fun seriously, expands compassion into new forms, builds the most loving and empowered community for women & girls, and creates a positive vibration of change in the process. This is what I am excited to share with you through inclusive dance, self love, transformative play, shining vulnerability, healing art creations, community music circles, and echoes of laughter.

I was invited to weave all these compassionate intentions into the Women & Girls League One Billion Rising Flashmob on Valentine’s Day. We turned the compassionate volume up loud for social change to be seen, surprising the 150+ diverse beings at the Women of Wisdom Conference. On that day we danced into the Eve Ensler message: “Now is the time to stop all violence towards women on this planet.” We are committed to bringing this vision into reality. The following quote is a sparkle from Eve Ensler’s talk at Bioneers 2014. She had said, “Mainly it allowed women & men to come back into their bodies, to reclaim public space, so they can begin to remember the world we know inside us, that we manifest outside us. It escalated ecstatic revolt.” Thank you, Eve, for being such a brilliant beacon for radical change in the flesh. She has become a catalyst for the kind of change I want to dance through life with. Eve Ensler quoted her personal inspiration, Emma Goldman, who said, “If I can’t dance, I will not come to your revolution.” Yes! It is time we bring to the front line our wild selves into making change with authentic joy and loving play.

I began the journey of leading this One Billion Rising Movement around the Pacific Northwest in 2013 and have not stopped dancing in the streets since. Through the recent years of love for social justice work, I found dance to be an ideal universal language, igniting positive messages of embodied consciousness. This form of consciousness delights the senses into being the change. This is an example of new profound actions in nourishing sustainable community and stepping into uncharted pathways of synergistic opportunities. I invite you to a trustworthy space for more root truth, holding each others hands with ecstatic courage, and infinite hugs of boundless being.

The compassionate spirit of this One Billion Rising Movement is a real example of the power of coming together with a common intent. Our league of diverse women danced, held space for voices to rise out of victims of violence, sang unconditional love messages of hope, and brought real prayer to the planet. Here is a link to this win-win report on Compassion Games International site, where you will find compassionate action raining all over the world. The Compassion Games has influenced me to shine leadership events for the Women & Girls League here in Seattle area in order to show how kind we really are. Are you ready for the challenge?

Would you like to join the Women & Girls league of Compassion? This is a call to action for YOU to rise with us in our cultivation of a new garden of flowers of compassion. This One Billion Rising flashmob is just the beginning of the survival of the kindest. We will be starting a weekly Women & Girls League compassion dance action every Sunday at 11-12:00 PM at Civetta Dance Space. This will be a seed of courageous women leaders of all ages to rise and share who you are, breaking the chain of suffering and bringing new meaning to social change service. It is time now in 2015 to join us into a sacred playful space to bring more compassion to self, others, and the earth.

For more information about Women & Girls Compassion Being League, please email Sommer Joy Albertsen at sommer@islandjoywellness.com

Edit Team: Sherry Is Dancing, Joey Crotty, and Jon Ramer

 

Solving Wicked Problems with the Compassion Games: Survival of the Kindest

(Header Image: “New Pioneers” from Mark Hensen)

At a time when religiously motivated violence seems to be more horrific and terrifying than ever, what would it take to transition our world to one of interfaith harmony and peace? It may seem pollyanna to wonder and idealistic to even ask if such a thing is possible. In a world permeated with intolerance and acts of hatred in the name of religion, how could we come to be in peace and harmony with one another? What would that take? A 21st century messiah? Divine intervention? Or a radical and creative shift of consciousness that playfully engages the full participation of the human species?

Social scientists consider this kind of problem a “wicked problem.” A wicked problem is one in which everyone agrees there is an issue, yet different stakeholders cannot agree on a definition of the problem or a course for a solution. This is because stakeholding groups in a wicked problem have radically different worldviews and thus different ways of understanding the problem and approaching a solution. World interfaith disharmony is truly such a wicked problem that can have horrific outcomes.

So how can we get to a world of interfaith harmony? Wicked problems can be “solved” by authoritative brute force, eliminating opposing perspectives and leaving power in the hands of a few. They can be “solved” through competition, leaving various parties to duke it out with a clear winner and loser. Or, they can be solved through collaboration, where all parties are brought to the table simultaneously, a common humanity is revealed, and overlaps in worldviews and values are discovered.

This is the very purpose of the Compassion Games: Survival of the Kindest. The Compassion Games awaken us to the power we each have as “players” to choose to play the “game” of life differently with each other and ourselves. As they say, “life games reflect life aims.”

We are living in a time of an emerging global world, where an essential interdependence and growing interconnectivities are Screen Shot 2015-02-18 at 1.19.15 PMliterally changing the “rules of the game” of how our world operates. The rules of the game have gone from finite, win-lose zero sum games (which, like war, are really lose-lose games) to nonzero sum games where we either all lose or we all win. Economic interdependence, terrorism, cyber-security, contagious disease control, climate change, and violence in the name of religion are just a handful of the major “nonzero” challenges that we now face, and each of them span any human-made borders that once artificially confined us as if we were fundamentally different, or separate, from our neighbors around the world.

Can we arise to this global challenge and unprecedented moment to work together, and make collaboration and compassion the objective of the game?

Since we all have a stake in the outcome of how the game is played in our global world, each player in this new game is immeasurably valuable. A vital component and often overlooked dimension to this unfolding “global village” is the role of the individual in arising to meet the challenges of these new circumstances. It is easy for individuals to feel less significant in a coalescing sea of 7+ billion people (as if more people make each of our thoughts, concerns, and actions matter less). This feeling is amplified even more so with looming challenges that are so macro in scale and difficult to conceive. These feelings, although understandable, couldn’t be more far from the truth.

Screen Shot 2015-02-18 at 2.12.47 PMThis is because in order to fundamentally solve the wicked problem of interfaith disharmony, we have to change the way we relate to each other, and this takes individual personal change and participation with others at a profound level. The collective cultural maturity required of us at this time calls for, in fact, the deepest kind of change: the change that comes from within. So in order for us to change collectively, it is each of us that needs to change personally. This is often more challenging, yet sometimes surprisingly easier and more profound than we can ever imagine. There is a power that each of us has in which we can choose to change the game we are playing, because we are playing one whether or not we are even aware of it. In this regard, we can define a game as engaging in any life activity directed toward bringing about a certain state of affairs.

Compassion is an infinite game in which the purpose of the game is to continue to play. Collaboration, too, is a game that defies physical laws, where one plus one can equal ten, and the more people that play, the more can win.

We know that some people think that playing games are frivolous and not an activity worthy of something as significant and important as interfaith harmony. The idea of competing to do good – competitive altruism – seems to go against the very idea of being thoughtful and kind toward others.

Yet the original latin root for the word competition is “to strive together,” not, as it is defined today, “to strive against.” Perhaps we need to redefine what we mean by the terms “games”, “play”, “player”, and “competition”. Reframing these ideas may be a key to unlocking the creativity and inspiration that it takes to rise together and reach new heights of radical creativity, cultural maturity, and just, lasting change. The Compassion Games compel and catalyze us to strive together as “players” to change the “games” we play on planet earth to the kinds that make life better for others, ourselves, and the earth.

You may be asking: “Really? What about all the conflict and contradictions in our ways of life?”

There are tremendous differences in our nationalities, cultures, and values, of course. For there to be peace amongst us we will have to coexist in a way that deeply respects our differences and honors our unique histories, cultures, backgrounds and nationalities.

For there to be harmony we will have to learn to interact and create value together. We will find common ground in our cultural differences and we will offer support and help while learning from each other. We will have a shared sense of fulfilling some greater purpose while recognizing that we are interdependent and need each other, now more than ever.

Fortunately for all of us, the case being made that “playing compassionate games with one another from all different backgrounds can radically and creatively change the world” doesn’t have to end here in words, as a spirited and hopeful ideal. Why? Because it just happened! With World Interfaith Harmony Week having just come to a close, the results are in… and what took place is simply astounding.

Who is Leading the Way?

It is interesting to note that King Abdullah II of Jordan, who has been seen recently in the US press as a strong leader taking on ISIS (the Islamic State), was greeted with cheers on returning home early from his trip to the US to conduct swift executions of two terrorist prisoners in retaliation for ISIS killing a Jordanian pilot. The cultural call in Jordan for vengeance was great and the King was in tune with his people. While some international human rights groups may have preferred that there have not been executions, the human rights groups also recognized that the executions were within Jordanian law and important to the people. It is these cultural differences we need to better appreciate and understand. Screen Shot 2015-02-18 at 2.35.30 PM

For at the same time that King Abdullah II is a “strong man” he is also dedicated to interfaith peace and harmony. Compassion
Games International (CGI) is well aware of this since in partnership with King Abdullah’s office we have just completed a seven day “coopetition” – a collaboration in which we cooperate to compete (or strive) with each other and not against each other by challenging groups from all over the world to show us their compassion in the name of interfaith peace and harmony.

From February 1st through the 7th, the Compassion Games were organized in partnership with the UN World Interfaith Harmony Week. King Abdullah II offered a $50,000 prize to be shared by groups working to create interfaith peace and harmony in the world.

This year the partners included the Dalai Lama Fellows as well as the United Religions Initiative (URI). URI hosted an online webinar for the occasion, calling out to over 670 cooperation circles that reach over one million people, inviting them to play.  URI also sponsored two University of Rochester students to attend the United Nations and speak about the Compassion Games. First Nations Solar put out the Solar Challenge for faith and interfaith groups to “Sun-Up” their houses of worship and embark on solarizing campaigns to shift to clean and renewable energy as an act of “green compassion” for Mother Earth.

The players and teams that participated came from all over the world including Asia, Africa, North America, Europe, and the Middle East. In the United States, the Silicon Valley Interreligious Council challenged other interfaith councils around the world and posted the greatest number of reports in an impressive display of what is possible when we come together to play, collaborate, and challenge one another to be the very best of our human nature.

Compassion Report Map Reflections from World Interfaith Harmony Week

There were over 30 teams around the world that posted nearly 100 reports to the Compassion Report Map. You can view all the reports by visiting the map here.

Here are four stories, each strikingly different yet equally profound, that are examples of what individual players and teams did during the Interfaith Harmony Week coopetition:

Report #1: Students Meet Muslims for the First Time (View Report)

The University of Rochester Interfaith Chapel student group hosted a tour of the Interfaith Chapel during World Interfaith Harmony Week. For 14 out of 15 of the students, this was the first time they had ever visited a mosque or even spoke to a Muslim. They observed prayer, toured the center, and engaged in dialogue with the Interfaith Chapel youth group. These students had a chance to learn about Islam and to meet and interact with local Muslim youth, opening their eyes to the realities of life for Muslim citizens in this difficult time in our world’s history.

Report #2: Nourish the Soul at the Souper Bowl (View Report)

World Interfaith Harmony Week began on Sunday, February 1st, which happened to be the same day as the Super Bowl. In aCompassion Games Souper Bowl - 2015 creative twist to kick-off Harmony Week and heighten our capacity for interfaith good, the Center for Spiritual Living in Seattle challenged the country in a Souper Bowl as a way to fill the food banks and take care of our neighbors in a time of need. Not surprisingly, the Center for Spiritual Living really stepped up… collecting well over 4,500 cans of soup in one week and raising $1,300 for local causes.

Report #3: 15,000+ People Served by Multifaith Day of Service (View Report)

The Peninsula Multifaith Day of Service dispatched more than 525 volunteers, ages 5 through 85, to a dozen sites through their region to work on 20 different projects. Pacifica Institute, who submitted this report on behalf of the Day of Service, joined the efforts with 30 volunteers of their own who also helped prepare breakfast for the 525+ volunteers. Over 15,000 people were directly affected by the actions of this awe-inspiring interfaith task force.

Report #4: Profound Reflection on Interfaith Harmony at Unity Celebration (View Report)

A report from an individual of the Interfaith Works and Women Transcending Boundaries team inspires us deeply. The report states that a “kaleidoscope” of virtually every faith joined together in unity, song, dance, and prayer, all to express their commonality within diversity. In their midst were refugees from Bosnia and Sudan who had lost everything – their homes, their families – when religious conflict tore their country apart.

From the Compassion Report Map: “When the Sudanese reminded us that churches helped them build new lives, that their history is one with the history of InterFaith Works, I thought, ‘humanity has committed some of its worst crimes in the name of religion, but religion is also capable of giving and restoring life.’ Indeed I have never experienced more compassion, acceptance, and forgiveness in one space…

“[Holding hands] as we sang… I felt myself a member of a new human community, one pregnant with possibilities, possibilities which have always been present in the highest values of our various traditions. This community, bound together not by language, not by race or creed, but by a powerful sense of hope and joy, came away from the WIHW knowing that – when it honors and accepts differences, when it forgives past injustices, but more importantly when it gathers together to celebrate all these things – religion’s long history of strife is transformed into a source of healing for the nations. Indeed, WIHW stands as an event that I dare say the critics of religion cannot pass off ‘as something that just happened’…”

Many Ways to Play and Harmonize

Between CGI and WIHW there were over 800 events and activities that took place during the seven day challenge and there were many different ways to play. These included:

  • An Interfaith Edition of the Secret Agent of Compassion that sent out missions each day of the coopetition.
  • As part of this years harmony week the WIHW produced the first interfaith anthem “The Gift of Love”. The lyrics are by HRH Prince Ghazi and the music and vocals by world renowned recording artist Mr. Sami Yusuf.  http://youtu.be/LHFuyK65Etg

Scoreboard Results from World Interfaith Harmony Week

During the coopetition we maintain a scoreboard so we can see the progress we are collectively making. The point of the game is not to “beat others” but to challenge ourselves to do and be our very best. Over 30 teams around the world submitted nearly 100 reports showing that well over 50,000 people were served through the Compassion Games in this seven day coopetition. This is just what got reported, and most players don’t report. No one will know for sure the impact of all this interfaith kindness and caring that was unleashed, and continues to be unleashed, on our precious world.

However, the experience of coordinating the Compassion Games World Interfaith Harmony Week has reassured us that the wicked problems of our time can be solved by transforming the game of life we play and reinventing what it means to live in peace and harmony together on our beautiful planet.

The Compassion Games are a way for anyone, anywhere, at anytime to amplify existing efforts or mobilize new ones. The Compassion Games infuse the spirit of play, collaboration, and kindness to bring people together of diverse backgrounds to address some of the worlds greatest challenges and most wicked problems.

We invite you to join with us by participating in the Compassion Games. The next coopetition – “Earth Service Week” – will take place from April 18th through April 26th, the same week that U.S. Mayors are challenging each other in the Give-A-Day of service, the brainchild of Mayor Greg Fischer of Louisville. The Back-To-School Coopetition takes place in October to bring the profound benefits of compassion to students in educational settings and in their personal lives. The annual global Compassion Games take place from September 11th through the 21st, the International Day of Peace.

Will you play with us? Game on!

Solving Wicked Problems with the Compassion Games: Survival of the Kindest
A Collaborative Work of the Compassion Games Team
Lead Author: Jon Ramer | Founder & “First Follower”
Contributing Author, Editor: Joey Crotty | Communications and Campaign Organizer
Review by Sande Hart (Head Coach) and Sommer Albertson (Coordinator of the Women/Girls League)
 

Compassion Games Quote

Silicon Valley Interreligious Council and Carry the Vision Bring the Compassion Games to Silicon Valley

We shall be a mighty kindness. – Rumi (and the Carry the Vision conference brochure)

I was invited to introduce and help launch the Compassion Games: Survival of the Kindest at the Carry the Vision 9th Community in Compassion Conference that took place in Silicon Valley on October 19th 2014.  It was amazing!

Carry the Vision Executive Director, Shelly Swan and her team took great care of me and all the participants who gathered that Sunday to “awaken the heart of compassion” the theme for the day.  This was the perfect opportunity to come together face-to-face after working together “virtually” to produce the 9|11 – 9|21 Compassion Games: Survival of the Kindest.  Earlier we wrote this story about the emergence of Compassionate Silicon Valley and their unique approach to organizing; we called it the “spiritual element“.

I had no idea how deep, committed and far along Carry the Vision and the many partners including the Silicon Valley Interreligious Council had progressed in creating a culture of non-violence and compassion in their community.  The conference was diverse, inclusive, and with seventy youth participating in a parallel event.

Unless we change individually, no one is going to change collectively. For generations we have been waiting for the other person to change first. A change of heart cannot be legislated; it must come out of conviction. – Arun Gandhi  (and the Carry the Vision conference brochure)

Girish ShahThere’s a great Compassion Games Team emerging in the valley led by a retired IBM engineer and Recipient of the 2014 Hindu American Foundation Mahatma Gandhi Award for the Advancement of Religious Pluralism, Girish Shah.  Girish is a Director of Carry the Vision, a Director of the Silicon Valley Interreligious Council and former president of the Jain Center. He is an innovator and committed to making the world a better place.

We started to work with Girish in the roll up to the 2014 Games and then the October conference. Girish quickly understood the Compassion Games, the Leagues and the idea of Coopetitions and saw their application to the tremendous work he’s already doing to unify the human family.   Girish and his family are an enormous gift to our world.  I don’t want to say more because I don’t want to embarrass him but here’s a summary of what he’s doing to use and expand the Compassion Games:

carrythevisiontwoWith his collaborators on the Silicon Valley Interreligious Council, Carry the Vision and the many others he has a tremendous Compassion Games team who no doubt appreciate his humble and focused way of making change happen.   It is an honor to work with Girish Shah and to enable the Compassion Games platform to grow and expand to accommodate his vision.  To the left is the page on the Carry the Vision site that introduces the Compassion Games.

We are enriched by his boundless energy and dedication to nonviolence, spiritual independence, equality, and compassion.

Currency of the Heart: Coins of Compassion in Compassionate Schools

(Above art, “Pocket Change”, and the piece below, are by the amazing group 6 Degrees of Creativity who are making this magnificent art for the Compassion Games.)

Compassionate Schools Network logoThis week marks the beginning of North Thurston County in Washington state Public School District’s participation in the Compassion Games as part of the “Compassionate Schools Movement”, and they aren’t alone. This year, over 50 schools have committed themselves to participating in the Compassion Games as a way to bring compassion and the Golden Rule to schools through the competitive spirit of giving and cooperation.

The demand for the Games in schools, in fact, gave rise to an entirely new Education league! Two exceptional educators have stepped up to coordinate this league; Rhaybin Shein and Lia Mandelbaum. Here’s their presentation, full of ideas, to help schools bring the Compassion Games into their classrooms.  And here’s a link to the presentation they prepared to help educators introduce the compassion games into schools.

In an inspiring feat of creativity for the Games, North Thurston County – led by Compassionate Schools advocate Superintendent Raj Manhas – formed a currency for their district called the “Coins of Compassion.” It is unlike any currency you’ve ever heard of. Over 20,000 of these coins have been given to principals and other leaders within the district, which are then given to anyone who commits an act of kindness or compassion. Paying it forward is the ultimate measure of economic success in a compassionate society. By the end of the Compassion Games, it is not the goal to have the most of these coins, but rather to give and receive them as much as possible. It is, effectively, a game of acknowledging others and their goodness, and in return, also being seen for the good we each give to others. Coins of Compassions are a living economy of the heart and they’re now in the hands of kids who are learning to give and receive them to and from each other.

The Compassion Games will be played during 9/11 to 9/21 in schools, and again in October from the 15th to the 25th at the request of educators seeking more time to prepare in the beginning of the school year.  So, if you were unable to form a team in your school for this year’s September games you can still get in on the fun and learning for October. Sign up here.

The emerging Compassionate School Movement is in large part led by Scarlett Lewis, founder of the Jesse Lewis Choose Love Foundation. Compassion Games, Charter for Compassion, and Compassionate Seattle hosted a conference 10626504_707342982667742_3748807769131385059_nin August called “Building the Compassionate Schools Movement: From Sandy Hook to Seattle,” igniting conversation and joint action to bring compassion into schools, to teach emotional wellness and whole person development, teacher and administrator interconnectivity and engagement, and to use compassion to propel student’s success for learning and life.

We are both honored and proud to be a founding member of the Compassionate Schools Network. Today, September 15th, is the launch of this new social collaborative network. The Compassionate Schools Network is a free online community and resource-sharing platform for students, parents, school staff, and community members.

Click here to learn more about the Compassionate Schools Movement and Network, including co-creative ideas for bringing Compassion into the classroom, and how your school can affirm the Charter for Compassion!

Click here for the full press release of the Compassionate Schools Network launch: http://bit.ly/Zn9pFQ

Spontaneous Ways to Make a Difference

“Everything’s Gonna Be Alright” — Your Compassion Games Begin!

The Games Begin!
A kind and understanding word, a generous act, the surprise of an unexpected gift, or the warmth of a smile…you’ve shared these acts of compassion as either the giver or receiver, probably many times. And while you may be facing one or many hardships, you have a dream within you that keeps you sharing acts of kindness despite signs that would have caused others to stop long ago.

And that’s why the Compassion Games were created! The Compassion Games were created for you and everyone else to win by realizing your dream for great kindness, empathy, and compassion for yourself, others, and your world. If you let it, playing the Compassion Games can make you stronger and alter what you think can be.

So, how will you live your dream for a better world? Will you Do Good and surprise someone you know with a random act of compassion? Will you Volunteer for a United Way service project? Will you Tell A Story of compassion? Or will you Get SuperBetter and complete your quests for the Epic Win and help make a Golden Reality where no one goes hungry and no one gives up?

In the end, you know deep in your heart that no one wins if someone loses. And you know deep in your heart that everything’s gonna be alright because you’re gonna make it alright.

So this is your moment to really shine! Play the Compassion Games and Go For the Gold! Together we can make this world a better, safer, kinder, and more just place to be. Let the Compassion Games begin!

Our Stand for Compassion at Seattle Center

As part of Compassionate Seattle’s plan to create “collective impact” we put together a physical “stand for compassion” that was on display at Seattle Center. On seven occasions we set up our stand and engaged with fellow citizens about our community and our plans to create a culture of compassion in our region.  We learned how people think and feel about compassion and how they see or don’t see themselves connected to other people and the greater community.

I came to believe that we are not just in an economic recession but we’re in a social recession as well. There’s no question that people want to see more compassionate action, as there is a mood of resignation and hopelessness associated with the current conditions.

However, being at Seattle Center offered us a bright spot as we told the story of the John T Williams Totem Pole Memorial and the difference that compassionate action made in turning a tragedy into an opportunity for healing. Two weeks after the shooting members of the John T William’s family and tribe met with city officials in a “restorative circle” that led to a peaceful creative solution, inspiring all of us to have similar courage.  At the Stand for Compassion at Seattle Center we met Tony Joe who met Rick and John T. Williams when she first arrived in Seattle in 1975.  Listen to Tony Joe describe her relationship with the Williams Brothers.

We also met people like Michael who a few times a week pulls over to help motorists in need. Hear his description of what he does and how he feels he’s representing Seattle when he does it!

The experiences we had being at Seattle Center taught us about our need to reconnect with each other and overcome the social isolation and disconnection.  This led to imagining the Compassion Games as a way to get us out of our norms and connected with each other.  Thank you to all the people who came down and helped us build a stand for compassion: Anne Stadler, Erik Lawyer, Susan Partnow, John Hale, Silvana Hale, Elle McSharry, Jeff VanderClute Libby Burk, Michael Truog, and John and Heidi Malcolmson.  Thank you to Seattle Center and the Next Fifty for supporting us in doing this. On to the games!